All-Time Indians: Earl Averill

Name: Howard Earl Averill Position: CF                      
Nick Name: Rock Number: 3                      
Tribe Time: 1929-1939 DOB: 05/21/1902                      
Accolades: Hall of Fame (1975), Retired #3, 6 Time All-Star (1933-38), 3 Top 5 MVP (1931, 1935-36)        
                                       
Stats G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI TB BB SO SB CS SB% OBP SLG AVG OPS ISOP
Best Season (1931) 155 627 140 209 36 10 32 143 361 68 38 9 9 50% .404 .576 .333 .980 .242
Career 1509 5909 1154 1903 377 121 226 1084 3200 725 470 66 55 55% .396 .542 .322 .938 .219

Earl Averill was the most prolific Indians hitter of all time. In just 11 seasons Averill accrued enough stats to be in the top 5 all-time among Indians in at bats, runs, hits, doubles, triples, home runs, RBI, total bases and walks. He is also in the top 10 in games played, OBP, SLG and OPS. His 140 runs in 1931 are the most in a single season in Indians history and he is in the top 10 for two other seasons as well. In 1936 he was one hit away from the all-time single season record for hits. He should be considered the greatest offensive centerfielder in Indians ever and one of the top five overall batters.

Averill was one of the most unlucky Indians ever as far as the postseason is concerned. He debuted 9 years after the Indians won their first World Series and retired 9 years before their second. Despite the team's .537 winning percentage during the time he played, Averill never made it to the World Series. His time on the Indians coincided with many other All-Time Indians stars, but most of them were either at the end of their careers (like Joe Sewell and Charlie Jamieson) or just starting out (like Bob Feller, Ken Keltner and Lou Boudreau). Earl Averill is the Indians all-time career leader in runs scored, triples, RBI (the only player with more than 1,000), and total bases. His accomplishments have been recognized by the Cleveland Indians by being placed in the Indians Hall of Fame and having his number retired and by Major League Baseball when he was entered into Cooperstown in 1975 by the Veteran's Committee. Averill died in 1983.

Earl Averill

Joseph Coblitz

About Joseph Coblitz

Joseph is the primary writer and editor of BurningRiverBaseball.com and has been since it's inception in 2011. He is a graduate of the University of Akron and currently resides in Goodyear, Arizona the Spring Training home of the Cleveland Indians.

Quantcast