All-Time Indians: Lou Boudreau

Name: Louis Boudreau       Position: SS/Manager              
            Number: 5              
Tribe Time: 1938-50/1942-50       DOB: 07/17/1917              
Accolades: Hall of Fame (1970), Retired #5, 7 Time All-Star (1940-44, 1947-48), 1948 MVP, 2 Top 5 MVP (1940, 1947)
Stats G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI TB BB SO SB CS SB% OBP SLG AVG OPS ISOP
Best Season (1948) 152 560 116 199 34 6 18 106 299 98 9 3 2 60% .453 .534 .355 .987 .179
Career 1560 5754 823 1706 367 65 63 740 2392 766 297 50 50 50% .373 .416 .296 .789 .119
  W L W%                                
As Manager 728 649 .529                                

 

Lou Boudreau was the greatest offensive shortstop in Indians history. He played during the most glorified time in Indians history, during the careers of Bob Feller, Larry Doby, Bob Lemon and Jim Hegan and was such a great baseball mind, he was not only the starting shortstop but the manager as well. During his 9 years as manager, Boudreau won more games than any other manager in Indians history. He also was the manager of the last Indians championship in 1948 and won the MVP for that season as well. His MVP was just the second won by a member of the Indians after George Burns won in 1926.

During his 13 year career, Lou Boudreau accrued as impressive a stat line as any player in Indians history. He currently stands in the top 5 in career games played, at bats, doubles and walks and in the top ten in runs hits and total bases. While he never had any amazing single seasons, Lou was very consistent as he hit higher than .283 every year from 1942-1949, during which time he batted .306. Three times (1941, 1944 and 1947) Boudreau hit 45 doubles in a season and each time he lead the AL. He also lead the AL in batting average in 1944 with a .327.

Lou Boudreau was one of only three Indians MVP's ever and one of only 6 Tribesmen to get his number retired. He was inducted into the Cleveland Indians Hall of Fame in 1954, just four years after retiring. He was then inducted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame in 1970. He died in 2001.

 

Lou Boudreau

About Joseph Coblitz

Joseph is the primary writer and editor of BurningRiverBaseball.com and has been since it's inception in 2011. He is a graduate of the University of Akron and currently resides in Goodyear, Arizona.

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